The Richardson Case, 1786

One of the first cases with footwear evidence presented in Court was the Richardson case from Kirkcudbright, Scotland in 1786.

The case depicted the fatal stabbing of a young woman.

As we can read in the deposition, the investigator tracked the footprints that actually left the scene: the perpetrator’s shoes appeared to be “heavily nailed and patched”. Tracings were made of these impressions and later the shoes of Richardson were identified as the source.

The words at the top “1st October, 1786 measure of the print of the foot of the person who murdered Elizabeth Hughan.” “2 October 1786 applied to William Richardson’s foot and fits it exactly. That is it fits the sole of the shoe. The nicks agreeing exactly with the heel.”

111111

Photo taken from “Forensic Footwear Evidence”, William J. Bodziak.

A scout should know..

“It is imperative that a scout should know the history, tradition, religion, social customs, and superstitions of whatever country or people he is called on to work in or among. This is almost as necessary as to know the physical character of the country, its climate and products. Certain people will do certain things almost without fail. Certain other things, perfectly feasible, they will not do. There is no danger of knowing too much of the mental habits of an enemy. One should neither underestimate the enemy nor credit him with superhuman powers. Fear and courage are latent in every human being, though roused into activity by very diverse means.”
Frederick Russell Burnham

Download the entire book “SCOUTING ON TWO CONTINENTS”>scouting2cont

 

burnham_scouting_cov

“The Art of Tracking: the origin of science”

9780864862938“According to a popular misconception, nature is “like an open book” to the expert tracker and such an expert needs only enough skill to “read everything that is written in the sand”. A more appropriate analogy would be that the expert tracker must be able to “read between the lines”. Trackers themselves cannot read everything in the sand. Rather, they must be able to read into the sand. To interpret tracks and signs trackers must project themselves into the position of the animal in order to create a hypothetical explanation of what the animal was doing. Tracking is not strictly empirical, since it also involves the tracker’s imagination. Generally speaking, ore may argue that science is not only a product of objective observation of the world through the perception. It is also a product of the human imagination. A creative hypothesis is not found or discovered in the outside world, it comes from within the human mind.”

Louis Liebenberg

This book is really a must read. The reasons are remarkable: it’s well structured, it’s complete, full of explanations and details. This book makes you think about this Art and her utility. It makes your mind not only accept her, but eagerly waits for learning her.

 

General Crook and the surrender of Geronimo.

e5be583d8cb5ffe48eafa895900c74c6
General George Crook with Apache Scouts, Arizona. 1886

1886: General George Crook,  was head of Departiment of Arizona, after the forced capitulation of Apache. But Geronimo was still on the loose. Indians used to call him Nantan Lupan (Grey Wolf), showing him their respect.

At that time, US Generals experienced a large, common employ of Indian Scouts to help them finding their quarries meanwhile a follow up. General Crook was order to round up all the Natives and bring them into reserves.

During march of the same year, General Crook and Geronimo had three intense days of negotiations in Cañon de los Embudos – Sierra Madre, approximately 86 miles from Fort Bowie. Geronimo asked photographer C.S.Fly to take pictures of himself with his two sons: “the only existing photograph’s of Geronimo’s surrender”.

Geronimo_surrenders_March_1886

That night, Geronimo and 25 of his fellows escaped along with the darkeness and through the mexican border. Crook lost his command and was replaced by Nelson A. Miles.

“Man Tracks” by Ion L.Idriess

This occurs to be an exceptional contribute the renowed Author Ion L.Idriess wrote in 1935 after an intense experience with “the mounted Police in the Austrialian wilds”. As explained in several posts ago, the mounted Police apprehended the ancient art of Tracking from aborigenal people in Kimberley Region, using it, for instance, to track flown away prisoners or slaves.

[Actually “Man Tracks” is still a missing one in my collection, due to the extreme difficulty to get a copy of this rare book, N.d.A.]

mantracks

History of Man Tracking: Iban Trackers.

88dfb0aabd-1st-platoon-sarawak-rangers-feb-1953

” The Sarawak Rangers were a para-military force founded in 1862 by the second Rajah of Sarawak, Charles Anthony Johnson Brooke. They evolved from the fort-men which were raised to defend Kuching in 1846. The Sarawak Rangers were first commanded by William Henry Rodway, briefly in 1862 and again from 1872 to his retirement in 1881, and were highly skilled in jungle warfare and general policing duties, being equipped with various western rifles, cannons and native weaponry.

They were based in a number of forts constructed at strategic locations in towns and at river mouths. Aside from protecting Sarawak’s borders, they were used to fight any rebels and were engaged in a number of campaigns during their history. In times of emergency or war, they could depend on the support of the local population and tribes-people.

The Sarawak Rangers were disbanded for a few years in the 1930s, only to be reformed and mobilised for the Second World War in which they attempted to defend Sarawak from Japanese invasion in 1942 at the start of the Pacific War. After the abdication of Charles Vyner Brooke in 1946, the Sarawak Rangers became a colonial unit under direct British control and saw action in both the Malayan Emergency and the Borneo Confrontation.

Eight weeks after the Malayan Emergency was declared on 16 June 1948, the first group of 49 Iban Trackers were sent to Malaya – to meet the request of the Malayan government. The Commonwealth forces need the tracking skills of the Ibans to track down the communist terrorists in the thick jungle of Malaya.

The Iban Trackers was an astounding success. As requested by the Iban leaders back home that their warriors be given full military responsibility, the para-military Iban Trackers were re-formed into the Sarawak Rangers – a full-fledged military unit with Lt Col C.J Baird as their first Commanding Officer on 1 January 1953. Organised into two platoons, Sarawak Rangers continued to perform the same task that they were doing when they were Iban Trackers.

Then on 31 March 1960, Sarawak Rangers (Malayan Unit) was disbanded and the next day, 1 April 1960, it became Sarawak Rangers (Far East Land Forces), to become a part of the British Army. They could now be deployed anywhere in the world.

However, on 15 September 1963, it was again disbanded and on 16 September 1963 it became the 1st Battalion, Malaysian Rangers. Only 100 members of the Sarawak Rangers (FELF) volunteered to continue their service while the rest opted to return to their long house. “

Font: wingedsoldiers.co.uk